Scrayingham and Leppington

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History (DRAFT)

SCRAYINGHAM (domesday name: Escraingham)

1) (From: John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales 1870-72)


A township in Pocklington district, and a parish partly also in Malton district, but all in E. R. Yorkshire. The township lies on the river Derwent, 3½ miles S E by S of Barton-Hill r. station, and 10½ N E of York; and has a post-office under York. Acres, 1, 470. Real property, £1, 952. Pop., 160. Houses, 31. The parish contains also the townships of Howsham and Leppington, and comprises 4, 689 acres. Pop., 480. Houses, 87. Howsham Hall and Aldby Park are chief residences. The living is a rectory in the diocese of York. Value, £661.* Patron, the Crown. The church is modern; and a chapel of ease is at Leppington. There is a national school.


2) (From: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis , 1848)


A parish, partly in the union of Pocklington, and partly in that of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Howsham and Leppington, 515 inhabitants, of whom 186 are in Scrayingham township, 11 miles (N. E. by E.) from York. This parish was anciently called Skeringham. It is bounded on the west by the navigable river Derwent, and comprises about 4780 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of 300 acres of woodland, in meadow and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 11. 10½.; net income, about £750; patron, the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land, under an act of inclosure, in 1825. The interior of the church was repaired in 1801; its register bears the date of 1648. There is a chapel of ease at Leppington.


Today, there are 38 houses in Scrayingham, and the voting population is about 73 adults.


LEPPINGTON (Domesday Name: Lepinton)


1) (From: John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales 1870-72)


‘... a township-chapelry in Scrayingham parish, E. R. Yorkshire; 4 miles NNE of StamfordBridge r. station, and 7½ SW by S of New Malton. Post town, New Malton. Acres, 1,163. Real property, £2,404. Pop., 132. Houses, 23. The manor belongs to Lady Mary Vyner. Gypsum is found. The living is annexed to the rectory of Scrayingham, in the diocese of York. The church was built in 1811, and was once a chantry to Missenden.’


2) (From: A Topographical Dictionary of England by Samuel Lewis , 1848)


‘... a chapelry, in the parish of Scrayingham, union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York, 8 miles (S. by W.) from Malton; containing 110 inhabitants. The Carey family formerly possessed a castellated mansion here, and a member of it was created Baron Carey, of Leppington, in 1622, but the title became extinct about the period of the Restoration. The township comprises by computation 1210 acres, the property and manor of Earl de Grey. Gypsum is obtained near the Derwent; and about eighteen inches below the surface, is a stratum of petrified shells and other marine productions four inches in thickness. In the village is a chapel of ease to the church of Scrayingham; the Wesleyans, also, have a place of worship. Foundations of the old mansion still remain; and many Roman coins have been found in the neighbourhood’.


Today, in March 2011, there are 26 houses in Leppington, and the voting population is about 57 adults

Baron Carey, of Leppington, 1622